What are the five colors of the Olympic rings?

We have seen these interlaced rings at Olympic Games since the early 1900s. The circles are always of equal dimensions and are either in one or in five different colors: blue, red, yellow, black, and green. While you may think each ring represents a specific continent, that is not the case.

What colors are the Olympic rings?

The circles, which have been seen at Olympic Games since the early 1900s, are always of equal dimensions and are either in one color or five different colors: blue, yellow, black, green and red — in that order.

Why are the rings 5 different Colours?

“The Olympic flag has a white background, with five interlaced rings in the centre: blue, yellow, black, green and red. This design is symbolic; it represents the five continents of the world, united by Olympism, while the six colours are those that appear on all the national flags of the world at the present time.”

What do the Olympic rings symbolize?

The Olympic symbol (the Olympic rings) expresses the activity of the Olympic Movement and represents the union of the five continents and the meeting of athletes from throughout the world at the Olympic Games.

Can I use the Olympic rings? The Olympic rings are the exclusive property of the International Olympic Committee (IOC). They are a mark protected around the world and cannot be used without the IOC’s prior written consent.

IMPORTANT:  Why was Japan Olympics Cancelled?

What is the logo of Olympic?

The original interlocking rings logo was designed by Baron Pierre de Coubertin in 1912. Each of the rings represent the five continents: Africa, Asia, America, Australia and Europe (maybe geography wasn’t Coubertin’s strong suit…) The iconic Olympic flag.

Why are the Olympic rings joined together?

In formation, they’re interlaced with one another, with three rings on top and two on the bottom. The connection of the rings was designed to embody a unified world. Not only do they represent the union of continents but the meeting of athletes from around the world at the Olympic Games.

Olympic Games Blog