What is the origin of the Olympic rings?

The interlocking rings of the Olympic flag was created by Baron Pierre de Coubertin, the co-founder of the modern Olympic games. The five rings represented the five participating continents of the time: Africa, Asia, America, Europe, and Oceania.

What do the five Olympic rings symbolize?

Based on a design first created by Pierre de Coubertin, the Olympic rings remain a global representation of the Olympic Movement and its activity. These five rings represent the five parts of the world now won over to the cause of olympism and ready to accept its fecund rivalries.

What inspired the Olympic rings?

In fact, the design simply burst forth from the imagination of a baron with effulgent facial hair. Baron Coubertin believed in sport as a kind of religion “with its own church, dogmas and ritual.” And when he cast about for a logo, he may have been inspired by — of all things — an advertisement for Dunlop tires.

Why are the Olympic rings joined together?

In formation, they’re interlaced with one another, with three rings on top and two on the bottom. The connection of the rings was designed to embody a unified world. Not only do they represent the union of continents but the meeting of athletes from around the world at the Olympic Games.

Can I use the Olympic rings? The Olympic rings are the exclusive property of the International Olympic Committee (IOC). They are a mark protected around the world and cannot be used without the IOC’s prior written consent.

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Is Asia bigger than Africa?

And he seems to have missed the memo that Africa is roughly 11.6 million square miles — making its surface area about five-and-a-half million square miles smaller than Asia, which takes up more than 17 million. Altogether, the world’s seven continents make up roughly 57.5 million square miles of land.

Olympic Games Blog